Superfoods to combat arthritis: Ginger, berries, fish and other anti-inflammatory foods

Monday, December 11, 2017 by

Individuals diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis can experience mild to severe joint pain, and this often affects their daily lives. Thankfully, there are some superfoods that can help you deal with this kind of pain.

These superfoods help lower oxidative stress, or the body’s ability to “counteract or detoxify harmful chemicals.” Dr. Bhawna Gupta, from KIIT University in India, said, “‘Regular consumption of specific dietary fibers, vegetables, fruits, and spices, as well as the elimination of components that cause inflammation and damage, can help patients to manage the effects of rheumatoid arthritis. Incorporating probiotics into the diet can also reduce the progression and symptoms of this disease.” She also advised patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis to switch from “omnivorous diets, drinking alcohol, and smoking” to “Mediterranean, vegan, elemental, or elimination diets,” after consulting their doctor or dietitian.

Based on a recent study, some of the superfoods that you can eat to help fight the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) include blueberries, ginger, green tea, and olive oil. Scientists advise sufferers to incorporate more of the foods listed below in their diet because they can help slow down the progressive and debilitating autoimmune disease. (Related: Arthritis – How to relieve the pain and heal naturally.)

Here are some superfoods that you can eat to help ease arthritic pain.

Anti-inflammatory foods to ease arthritis

  • Dairy — Yogurt (curd)
  • Fruits — Dried plums, grapefruits, grapes, blueberries, pomegranates, mangoes, bananas, peaches, and apples
  • Herbs — Sallaki (Boswellia serrata), ashwagandha (Withania somnifera)
  • Legumes — Black soybean, black gram
  • Oils — Olive oil, fish oil, borage seed oil capsules
  • Spices — Ginger, turmeric
  • Tea — Green tea and basil (tulsi) tea
  • Whole grains and cereals — Wheat, rice, oats, corn, rye, barley, millets, sorghum, and canary seed

It’s difficult to detect the early stages of rheumatoid arthritis and if left undetected or misdiagnosed, the disease can rapidly progress in the first few years. Dr. Gupta advised, “‘Supporting disease management through food and diet does not pose any harmful side effects and is relatively cheap and easy.” She continued, “Doctors, physicians and dietitians can use our study to summarize current proven knowledge on the links between certain foods and rheumatoid arthritis.” According to Gupta, if doctors determine the nutritional and medicinal requirements of their patients, it can be used to improve their health.

Medical experts often suggest different dietary plans for rheumatoid arthritis, like Mediterranean, vegan, and seven to 10 days of fasting. The research team’s study is only the second overall assessment of diet and food regarding arthritis and was published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition. The study also focused on reporting dietary interventions and specific foods that have proven long-term effects.

The researchers hope that their study will prove useful as a reference for the development of new medicines. Dr. Gupta shared, “Our review focused on specific dietary components and phytochemicals from foods that have a proven beneficial effect on rheumatoid arthritis… Pharmaceutical companies may use this information to formulate nutraceuticals.” The doctor also believes that nutraceuticals have a distinct advantage over chemically-tailored medicines since the former do not have side effects, are made from natural sources, and are cheaper.

Dr. Gupta’s team also reviewed research from several laboratory experiments under different conditions. According to the research, since dietary components can vary based on geography and weather conditions, patients must look into their allergies, nutritional requirements, and other food-related disease history. She concluded that the general public must talk to their health care providers and dietitians first before following any diet program or food compounds covered by the study.

Other recommended foods to fight rheumatoid arthritis

If you want to eat more foods that can help combat the symptoms of this disease, check out the list below:

  • Blackstrap molasses  While scientific research into the effectiveness of molasses is limited, it can help relieve pain because it is rich in vitamins and nutrients like magnesium. Magnesium helps preserve nerve and muscle function as well as joint cartilage, says the Arthritis Foundation.
  • Coriander — Also known as cilantro and Chinese parsley, coriander is one of the many natural remedies that can have a beneficial effect on chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, according to a study published in Toxicology and Industrial Health in September 2014.
  • Pineapple  The stem of a pineapple contains bromelain, a digestive enzyme that can help reduce inflammation in people with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. But since pineapple stems are inedible, you can increase your bromelain intake by taking supplements in capsule or pill form.

You can learn more about superfoods and other natural cures at Cures.news.

Sources include:

DailyMail.co.uk

EverydayHealth.com



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